How To Record Your Podcast Interviews With Twilio

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A few years ago, podcasting required a ton of hardware. Now, anyone with a laptop, a cell phone, and a person to interview, can get a podcast up and running in minutes. In this tutorial, I’ll show you can use Twilio to record and stream your podcast interviews easily.

Getting A Good Interview

Some of my favorite podcasts feature live call-in segments or interviews. But, when the interview guest is remote, things can get tricky. There’s a high barrier to entry when you have to ask your guest to download software, use a certain password, or try to find a better internet connection before getting the interview started. Using a Twilio number,  all they have to do is dial in.

<Record>ing Your Podcast

First, head on over to Twilio.com to buy a number in your area.

Next, we’ll set up the the number to record your interview using TwiMLets. Think of these as different tools we use to build out your Twilio number.

<Response> tells Twilio what you want it to do.

<Say> greets your caller.

<Dial> tells Twilio to connect your caller to your conference room.

<Record> tells Twilio to record your call

<Conference> connects all your callers together in a room.

Pro tip: If you want to greet your listener with custom hold music, embed the URL of a song into

The Code

All you need to get going is a few lines of code. Check out the example below.

Downloading Your Interview

When you’re done with your interview, your recording is all ready for download in the Log section of your Twilio Account. Just click on Logs—> Recordings—>and Listen. This will open up a stream of your call. To download the recording, just add “.mp3” to the end of the URL, right click and select “Save Sound As.”

 

You can easily export the file into GarageBand, ProTools or Ableton for editing, or upload it immediately to SoundCloud.

  • ObjetSocial

    Sounds great but it would be nice if this brief explanation was expanded to provide detailed step by step instructions for non-coder types (like me!).

    • Hey @objetsocial:disqus,
      Which part are you getting hung up on? Happy to help clarify.
      I can explain how to set this up in further detail as well if you can email me at kyleky(at)twilio(dot)com.
      Also we have training courses for new coders here: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/twilio and if you need a tutor you can get support here: http://www.airpair.com/twilio

      • ObjetSocial

        I appreciate your response.

        Not hung up, per se, just unclear. For example, you’ve said:

        *******First, head on over to Twilio.com to buy a number in your area.

        Next, we’ll set up the the number to record your interview using TwiMLets. Think of these as different tools we use to build out your Twilio number.

        tells Twilio what you want it to do.

        greets your caller.

        tells Twilio to connect your caller to your conference room.

        tells Twilio to record your call

        connects all your callers together in a room.********

        But the steps are left hanging from there. These are the commands, obviously. But you haven’t explained how they fit into the code. Perhaps it’s too detailed to explain concisely, but then why not state that? If it’s intended to be more coder specific, then perhaps the headline is too vague. Many, many podcasters are not coders. Thanks for the links though.

        • @objetsocial:disqus
          Thanks for the clarification. If you shoot me an email, I can explain those individual steps and how each TwiML verb has a specific role in the code.